Remortgage

Whether you currently have a mortgage or are thinking of getting one, you’ll likely need to remortgage at some stage during homeownership. We have access to over 12,000 mortgages from 90+ lenders. Book a call in today to see how we can save you time and money.

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Remortgage

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How to apply for a remortgage

1

Mashroom mortgages help you with eligibility

If you are thinking about buying your first rental property, we will help you with eligibility and source available deals for free.

2

We’ll guide you

Our advisors will guide you through the whole process, for free. We’re different from other mortgage brokers, because we get paid by lenders, and rely on technology.

3

We’ll reduce a void period

We can help you with conveyancing too. Once you bought your property, reduce the void period by setting your listing live through Mashroom, and find your first tenants off the bat.

What is remortgaging?

Remortgaging is the process of changing your mortgage product, either with the same lender or moving it to another one. Essentially, it means that you choose a different deal than the one you initially got when you bought your home. Your new mortgage will replace the old one and have new terms. These are likely to include:

The amount you pay is transferred to another mortgage policy, effectively starting a brand new mortgage deal. When you move onto a new mortgage deal, the money borrowed pays off the old one. 

Most people remortgage when their current initial rate is about to expire. By remortgaging, you can avoid moving onto the lender’s standard variable rate (SVR), which typically has much higher payments than the initial rate. The remortgage market is big business in the UK, with most lenders remortgaging their property every two to five years. If, for example, you have a 25-year mortgage, you could end up remortgaging your home five times within that period. 

What's the difference between a remortgage and a second mortgage?

It’s important not to get remortgaging and a second mortgage mixed up. With a remortgage, you’re simply replacing your current one with a new one. The terms might be different, but it’s not an additional mortgage. 

A second mortgage means taking out a new mortgage in addition to your current one. Subsequently, you would have two mortgages on two separate properties, with the other house acting as your second home.

What's the difference between a remortgage and a second mortgage?

Do I have to remortgage?

There’s no requirement stating that you need to remortgage. However, if your initial rate comes to an end and you decide to stay on your current mortgage deal, you could end up paying considerably more each month – sometimes more than £500 per month. Your initial rate might be around 2%, but the SVR is 4.5%, for example. 

Because of the higher costs, most people remortgage when their initial rate ends. There are other reasons why people mortgage, such as debt consolidation, but we’ll get onto that later.

Do I have to remortgage?

How does remortgaging work?

The remortgaging process will be similar to your first mortgage, just with a slightly shorter timeframe. It may be even faster if you’re going with the same lender (sometimes this is known as a product transfer), as they will already have some of your details. Here’s what you can expect when remortgaging:

1

Your current lender contacts you

Suppose you’re on an initial rate (also known as an introductory deal and a discounted deal). In that case, the lender of your current mortgage will get in touch before the initial expiry date to let you know that your initial period is coming to an end. This allows you to plan in advance, so your current deal doesn’t revert to the SVR, and you end up paying more. If the SVR is higher than the initial rate (and it usually is), now is the time to look at remortgaging.

2

Ask your lender for a closing balance

Upon request, your lender will give you a redemption statement. This tells you the amount required to pay off the remaining mortgage and any fees associated with it (more on that later). The figure is the minimum amount you need to borrow on the new mortgage.

3

Decide on the type of mortgage you want

You need to find a new mortgage, which you can either do via a broker or research using comparison websites. Consider whether you want a repayment or interest-only mortgage and if it should be a fixed-rate or tracker mortgage. 

4

Apply for a new mortgage

Once you’ve decided on a lender and type of mortgage, you will need to go through the application process. At this point, it’s mostly treated as a new mortgage from the lender; only they transfer the balance from the old deal onto the new one once everything has been greenlit. Within the application, you may need to resubmit your documents, get a valuation on the home and instruct a conveyancer.

Why should I remortgage?

So now you know what a remortgage is and how it works, why should you go through the process of remortgaging your home? What are the reasons why people decide to remortgage?

The initial rate is about to expire

The initial rate is about to expire

Again, people remortgage primarily to avoid moving onto the lender’s SVR and potentially paying more each month because of higher interest rates. The entire term might be 25 years when you get a mortgage, but the initial rate period could only last for two years. In this scenario, you will pay lower interest rates. But when the rate comes to an end, the goal is to remortgage to a new, lower initial rate. For example, your remortgage can have an entire term of 23 years (you’ve already paid off two years) with an initial rate of two years.

To move to a better deal

To move to a better deal

Some people remortgage before their initial rate expires. This could be because they’ve found a better rate elsewhere and want to save money. Remortgaging before your initial rate expires can be smart, but you’ll need to check repayment fees with your current lender. Some lenders charge a percentage of the overall mortgage if you leave before the initial rate expires.

You want a different type of mortgage

You want a different type of mortgage

You may decide to remortgage if you want another type of mortgage. For example, you’re currently on repayment options but want to move onto an interest-only mortgage.

You own more of your home

You own more of your home

If you’ve already paid off a significant amount of your mortgage, you might be eligible for a much better rate because your equity in the property has increased. In this case, you might decide to look at remortgage options.

Who should I remortgage with?

1

Can I remortgage with the same lender?

It’s possible to remortgage with the same lender and, in most cases, the most straightforward option. This is because it’s unlikely that you’ll need to go through affordability checks as long as you’re not borrowing more. The lender has your details already, and they don’t tend to perform new eligibility checks. Remortgaging with the same lender is known as a product transfer.

2

Should I remortgage with the same lender?

While remortgaging with a new lender might be the easiest option process-wise, it’s not always the best move. Lenders are competitive and usually offer appealing interest rates to acquire new customers. You may find better options on the market if you move your mortgage over to another lender.

3

Will a new lender lend on my property?

Just because you have a mortgage on your home with a current lender doesn’t necessarily mean a new one will give you a mortgage. In most cases, it shouldn’t be a problem. Yet, it’s still something to keep in mind. Some lenders won’t lend on properties near commercial premises, in high rises, ex local authority or homes without a working kitchen or bathroom (even if you plan to refurbish). Therefore, it’s best to check the new lender’s requirements beforehand.

4

Do I need a solicitor?

If the product transfer is relatively straightforward, then it’s unlikely that you’ll need a solicitor. However, if you’re planning on making changes, such as adding or removing someone to the mortgage, you’ll probably need a solicitor or conveyancer to oversee the process.

What are the benefits of remortgaging with the same lender?

Other than a potentially faster process, there may be several benefits to remortgaging with the same lender. Essentially, it all depends on the type of offers the lender has in their product range.

Save money

Save money

You could also save money on your current mortgage by switching to a product with a lower rate. It all depends on whether or not the lender is offering more competitive rates when it’s time for you to remortgage. It’s also worth considering fees and legal costs – if you’re remortgaging without borrowing additional funds, you may avoid paying legal fees and product costs associated with the mortgage.

Borrow more

Borrow more

The lender may also perform a new valuation because your house value has increased, giving you more equity in the property and the ability to borrow more.

Can I borrow more?

Can I borrow more?

Many homeowners who remortgage decide to borrow more. Several reasons for this include borrowing excess money for home renovations and buying a new property or debt consolidation.

Home renovation

Home renovation

If you’ve lived in your house for several years and have paid off some of the mortgage amount, you might decide that it’s a good time to release more equity from the property to redecorate. Doing so could improve the home’s value further. Many lenders also offer lower rates for homeowners making green improvements. So if the aim is to make your home more sustainable with environmentally-friendly upgrades, you might be able to get a mortgage with a lower rate.

Additional property purchase

Additional property purchase

Some homeowners borrow more money to purchase a second home or investment property. This is especially true if you’re a buy-to-let landlord and want to grow your property portfolio. You can use the equity released as a deposit on the next property.

Debt consolidation

Debt consolidation

Another reason why people remortgage is to consolidate debts. Credit cards and loans usually have much higher interest charges than mortgages, so borrowing more to cover these debts could help you reduce your monthly repayments. Be careful, though. Remortgaging to consolidate debt only works if you’re saving more in the long term. If not, it might be worth trying to get your additional debt under control instead of remortgaging.

Remortgaging to borrow more is big business

Around half of homeowners borrow more when remortgaging, which goes to show how popular it is. A third even said releasing more equity was their primary aim, according to conveyancing provider LMS

Whether or not you decide to borrow more depends on your personal goals and the amount of equity you have in the home. Property prices have increased by more than 8% in the last 12 months, so there’s a chance that your home saw its value rise.

Remortgaging to borrow more is big business

What are the disadvantages of remortgaging?

While remortgaging has many advantages, there are some disadvantages and drawbacks. That’s why it’s important to look at every scenario before deciding to remortgage your home. Some of the drawbacks to remortgaging include:

Longer debts

Mortgage fees

Your home can be repossessed

Eligibility

Does it cost anything to remortgage?

Applying for a remortgage won’t cost you anything, but there are likely to be fees involved with your previous mortgage that could potentially cost between hundreds and thousands of pounds depending on the type of remortgage and when you do it. 

Broker fee

Broker fee

There may be fees involved if you use a broker to find your remortgage. Many brokers offer a free-of-charge service and make their money through the lender, but some charge a fee for their service. The average broker fee is around £500.

Early repayment charge

Early repayment charge

An early repayment charge is essentially a penalty for repaying your mortgage early. This charge can come into effect if you remortgage before the initial rate ends. So if you have an initial rate for five years but remortgage after three, you will probably pay an early repayment charge (ERC). The costs vary, but they’re usually a percentage of the mortgage and time left on the initial rate. For example, if you remortgage three years into a five-year deal, you may have to pay 3% of the mortgage. If you do it with just one year left on a five-year deal, you might be subjected to 1% of the mortgage.

Deeds release fee

Deeds release fee

A deeds release fee is also known as an admin charge and is paid to your existing lender so they can forward the property’s title deeds to your solicitor. Deeds cost between £50 and £300.

Product fee

Product fee

Also known as the arrangement fee, this is the cost of the lender arranging the mortgage and can usually be added to the overall mortgage amount, though doing so will incur interest.

How can I get a remortgage?

There are three primary ways to get a remortgage: another deal with your current lender, using a broker or finding a new lender and applying with them directly. Each choice has its advantages and disadvantages.

Using your current lender
Broker
With the lender directly

The most straightforward option on the table involves using your current lender and changing to another deal with them. They will write to you a few months before your mortgage expires, reminding you that the initial period is coming to an end and asking if you’d like to renew. 

If you remortgage like-for-like with your current lender, there’s usually no need to go through the affordability process. That’s because they already have your details from the first application. 

There are caveats to this, however. If a lengthy amount of time has passed, say, five years, they may wish to recheck your affordability to see if anything has changed. If you’re borrowing more, they could also perform an affordability check to see if you meet the criteria for the higher borrowing amount.

Should you decide to look for a new lender offering the best rate, you may instruct a broker. Mortgage brokers will scour the market and come back with the best options based on your requirements and the information provided to them. 

For example, if your current mortgage is for £250,000 with £175,000 left on balance, but you want to borrow an additional £10,000, they will look for options amounting to £185,000 on the best available interest rate. 

Before enlisting the broker’s help, it’s essential to check their terms and conditions. Some brokers charge a fee or take a percentage for their services. Other broker options are completely free of charge as they earn their money from the lender directly. Brokers tend to have access to more mortgage options than those available on the high street or comparison websites.

Of course, there’s always the option of approaching the lender directly for your remortgage. In this scenario, you will need to find the lender through online research using comparison websites or by going straight to the lender’s website (or high street bank or building society). 

If you’re reasonably comfortable with the process, you may decide to go with a new lender directly. Using a comparison website allows you to measure each lender and see which offers the best interest rates and overall mortgage product.  

Just remember that you’ll be treated as a new customer and will be required to provide the necessary documents. This means showing proof of ID, payslips, income and expenditure and having a hard credit check performed on your credit report.

Joint remortgaging

1

Can I get a joint remortgage?

Joint mortgages are reasonably standard, especially for couples who buy their house together. Indeed, most mortgages in the UK are joint applications. Therefore, it’s possible to get a joint remortgage, especially if you already have a joint mortgage in place.

2

How does a joint remortgage work?

A joint remortgage works much in the same way as a regular remortgage. The primary difference is that both or all the people named will be assessed when the lender carries out their affordability and eligibility checks. Again, this might not apply if you’re using the same lender. But if you’re moving your mortgage to a different lender, you can all expect to undergo things like a credit check. If one of you has had credit problems, it may affect the deals available, even if the other applicant has a stellar credit record. Ultimately, the lender wants to verify that all of the applicants can make the repayments on the remortgage. 

3

Borrowing more

Joint applications combine their income, giving them access to a higher amount of borrowing. If you wish to borrow more for a remortgage, the same process as your initial mortgage applies. Any extra funds you borrow are based on the combined income of all applicants.

4

What about if my first mortgage was a solo application?

It’s possible to change an initial solo mortgage into a joint one for your remortgage. This is also often known as a mortgage transfer. It can also work the other way round if you’d like to remove someone from a mortgage and turn a joint mortgage into a solo one. To do this, you will need to prove your affordability and show that you can manage the payments by yourself.

Start saving money and remortgage today

Book a call at a time that suits you and one of our friendly advisors will see how we can help you remortgage and save money on your repayments.

Start saving money and remortgage today

How can I improve my remortgage options?

The options available largely depend on your current mortgage balance and how you’d like to remortgage. If you wish to borrow more, you will need to meet new affordability criteria, as well as other eligibility. Before remortgaging, you can take a few actions to give yourself the best chance of getting a remortgage.

Check your credit score

Don’t apply for credit before the applications

Start early

Check your property’s value

What documents do I need?

Moving to a new lender or borrowing more with your current lender will likely result in you needing to show documentation proving you can afford the new mortgage. Documents you may need include:

Proof of ID

Proof of ID

You’ll need to prove your ID with a photo passport or driving licence. The latter should display your current address to avoid complications.

Proof of address

Proof of address

A recent bank statement or utility bill will be required to prove your current address. These usually need to be dated within the last three months.

Proof of income

Proof of income

The new lender will want to see proof of your income in the form of recent payslips. You’ll need to show up to three months’ payslips. If you’ve recently started a new job, you can provide the lender with a P60.

Additional sources of income

Additional sources of income

This is necessary if you have an extra income, either through a side hustle or a buy-to-let property rental income. Indeed, you will need to provide all of the details relating to the rental property if you’re applying for a buy-to-let remortgage.

Proof of expenses

Proof of expenses

The lender will want to see your current income/expenditure ratio. Therefore, they will ask for around three months’ bank statements. These statements shouldn’t be amended and need to reflect your outgoings, including utility bills and other expenditures.

Information about your current mortgage

Information about your current mortgage

You can also expect to provide information about your current mortgage. The new lender will need this before they can begin to process your application. 

How long should I fix my rate for?

You will need to get a new initial rate when you remortgage, either with a fixed rate or tracker. Most borrowers opt for a fixed rate, so their mortgage stays the same throughout the initial term regardless of what happens with interest rates. But how long should you fix the rate if you choose this option?

Two years

Two years

Traditional, two-year fixed-rate mortgages were the most popular option. This is because it fixed the rate without tying the borrower in for too long. If rates decreased, the borrowers wouldn’t have to wait long before getting an opportunity to remortgage. 

Five years

Five years

Over the last decade or so, five-year fixed-rate mortgages have become increasingly popular. The base rate reached a record-level low in 2020, and the only way for it to go is up. Indeed, rates have already begun to creep up, and many feel that a five-year fixed-rate mortgage gives them protection against rising rates.

10 years

10 years

More and more people are locking their mortgages for 10 years to combat the rising interest rates. If you want long term security and are happy with the monthly payments, a 10-year option could be a good move.

25 years

25 years

Recently, long-term fixed-rate mortgages have become an option in the UK. They are popular in other mortgage markets around the world but have taken a while to arrive on these shores. Again, if you’re happy with the monthly repayments, a 20 or 25-year fixed-rate mortgage gives you security against rising interest rates. It also means you won’t need to remortgage again, as you will probably pay off your entire balance by the time the length of the mortgage expires.

How does remortgaging affect my credit score?

Does remortgaging affect my credit score?

Do I need a good credit score?

Don’t apply for other credit

My credit score decreased after getting a mortgage

Can I remortgage with poor credit?

What can I do to improve my credit rating?

How to remortgage to the best deals

Comparing mortgage rates is the best way to find a deal that suits you. Using a comparison website is one way to do this, as you can measure different mortgage products against each other. Some of the things to look for include:

1

Interest rate

Ideally, you want to find the lowest interest rate. Doing so means keeping your monthly payments low and having more surplus money for other things, like day-to-day spending and savings.

2

Product fee

Product fees can be anywhere between £0 and a few thousand pounds. Most of the time, you can add the fee to the loan, but it’s still worth trying to find a lender with low product fees in an effort to reduce the overall cost of your mortgage.

3

APRC

The annual percentage rate of charge (APRC) calculates the total interest due over the loan. The lower the APRC, the less you have to pay in interest throughout the entire loan, whether on an initial rate or SVR. APRCs are more common with loans and credit cards, though they’re still relevant to mortgages.

4

Mortgage length

You might decide to reduce your term if you’re remortgaging. This would essentially result in higher monthly repayments, but it also means that you’ll pay the mortgage balance off sooner. Alternatively, you can extend the length for lower monthly payments. However, the overall cost of the mortgage will increase.

Can I remortgage if I’m self-employed?

As a self-employed person, you should still be able to remortgage – especially if you already have a mortgage. It can be slightly harder getting a mortgage when you’re self-employed, and some lenders only lend to people in full-time PAYE employment. Therefore, you’ll need to check with the lender to see if they offer mortgages and remortgages for self-employed individuals.

Can I remortgage if I’m self-employed?

What do I need to remortgage?

Be well prepared

Show your workflow

Credit score

Speak to a mortgage advisor

How long does remortgaging take?

How long does a remortgage take?

It can take between four to eight weeks for a remortgage to complete. As a rule of thumb, you should expect it to be closer to eight weeks to avoid disappointment. If the lender needs to value your home, the process can take longer. It’s also worth considering other aspects, such as details about the lease or freehold if you own an apartment. Minor, unforeseen issues can arise with complex processes like mortgages, so give yourself plenty of time to remortgage.

How long does a remortgage take?

Is it faster to use the same lender?

Why does it take longer with a new lender?

What can delay the remortgage process?

What happens if I remortgage early?

When can I remortgage?

How many times can I remortgage?

What are the penalties for remortgaging early?

How does an ERC work?

Most lenders have an ERC if you leave the mortgage before the initial period ends. You pay a percentage of the time left on the mortgage when moving your current deal over to a new lender. 

For example, if there are five years left on the initial period, you’ll pay 5% of the loan amount. So if your mortgage is £200,000, you may have to pay a £10,000 early repayment charge. If there are four years left, you pay 4%, a three-year period is 3%, etcetera. Most people who remortgage early do so with just one or two years left on their deal. Let’s say you owe £200,000 and have one year left on your deal with an ERC of 1%; you would need to pay £2,000.

How does an ERC work?

Is remortgaging early worth it?

The early repayment charges on a mortgage are expensive and put in place to deter you from remortgaging before your deal ends. That’s why most people wait until their initial period is over – they don’t want to pay thousands of pounds to switch their mortgage. 

The only way it makes sense is if you save more than it costs to switch the mortgage. For example, if the ERC is £1,000, but you’re going to save £5,000 by switching, then it seems reasonable to leave the mortgage early and pay the ERC. 

Is remortgaging early worth it?

Remortgaging with a buy to let

Remortgages on buy-to-let properties work much in the same way as residential remortgages. However, it’s not uncommon for some landlords to remortgage early before their current deal expires.

When to remortgage?
What is the criteria?
Rental income stress test
Finding a BTL

Choosing the right time to remortgage a buy to let has many advantages, and it’s not always about finding the best rate – although you can save money on the monthly repayments. 

Equity release is one of the most popular reasons landlords remortgage their buy-to-let property. Withdrawing more capital for the property can aid you in getting another buy-to-let property and increase the investments you own.  

Even if you don’t want to release equity, you can still remortgage when your current deal ends. The process is essentially the same as a residential remortgage, only with a few minor differences.

Again, as with residential remortgages, the criteria change depending on the deal type. If you remortgage with the same lender, it’s unlikely much will alter as they have your details already. If, however, you’re moving to a new lender, you may need to meet the following requirements:

  • Earn a minimum of £25k per year
  • Show documentation, such as proof of ID, payslips (or tax return), proof of homeownership and undergo a credit check
  • Pass the rental income stress test

One of the primary differences between residential and buy-to-let mortgages is how the stress test is conducted. While residential lenders focus on your income, most buy-to-let lenders prioritise your rental income. To qualify for a buy-to-let mortgage or remortgage, it typically needs to be a percentage of the monthly payments (usually 125%). 

For example, if you borrow £200,000 on 3% interest, the yearly interest payment is £6,000. Therefore, the annual rental income needs to be at least 125% of that figure, which is £7,500 per year.

Many landlords use a broker, as it saves them time and effort. Of course, nothing stops you from looking for a remortgage using comparison websites and your own know-how. But the majority of landlords prefer the broker approach, especially as some buy-to-let lenders only work with brokers.

Remortgaging a second home

Around 3% of homeowners have a second home. That’s roughly 772,000 people who will likely need to remortgage at some stage. Again, a remortgage on a second home is similar to residential and buy-to-let mortgages. 

As with your first mortgage, you’ll likely be asked if you want to buy add-ons, such as mortgage protection insurance (MIP). Whether or not you get these extras depends on your needs, but some may come in handy.

Remortgaging a second home

What is MIP and when should I get one?

Mortgage insurance protection provides cover if you can no longer pay for your mortgage. This might be because you’ve been made redundant or can no longer work due to injury or illness. 

It’s certainly worth considering. There is only limited help from the Government if you can no longer repay your mortgage (they may cover the interest, but that’s it). Therefore, MIP could help you if something unforeseen happens that stops you from paying for your mortgage.

What is MIP and when should I get one?

Are there alternatives to remortgaging?

If you’re looking to switch your mortgage from one lender to another for the same amount or are doing a product transfer, then remortgaging is probably the best choice. But if you’re thinking about releasing equity, getting a remortgage isn’t the only option on the table. There are alternatives available that might be more suitable.

1

Grants

You might decide to remortgage to release equity so you can redecorate or renovate your home. Yet, there may be grants available to spruce up your house, especially if your reasons for doing so are eco-friendly. The Green Homes Grant is specifically designed to help homeowners modernise their property with green initiatives, and it pays up to £5,000.

2

Second charge

A second charge loan works like your mortgage and is registered at the Land Registry separately. When your house is sold, the first mortgage is paid off, and then the second charge loan is paid. Some people get a second charge because they’re happy with their current rate and don’t want to change it. Others get one because they need to improve their credit score or have difficulties remortgaging because they’ve become self-employed since the first mortgage. A second charge is also known as a second mortgage or further advance.

3

Home improvement loan

A home improvement loan might be a viable alternative to a remortgage. You can do this through a secured or unsecured loan, though checking the interest rates is essential. Loans can come with high interest, meaning your monthly repayments may be on the high side. Still, they might be a good option if you plan to pay off the loan faster than the mortgage.

Summary

With this guide, you can feel more confident about getting a remortgage. There are many options on the table, and it’s all about finding the right deal. Whether you’re remortgaging for equity release, to reduce monthly payments or because your initial period is about to expire, you can take advantage of a competitive market. And if you’d like some more expert advice, speak to Mashroom’s mortgage advisors free of charge to see your options and get a remortgage that suits your requirements.

Summary
Mashroom Mortgages is a trading name of Emash Ltd which is an appointed representative of Mortgage Advice Bureau Limited and Mortgage Advice Bureau (Derby) Limited which are authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

Emash Ltd. Registered Office: 21 Navigation Business Village Navigation Way, Ashton-On-Ribble, Preston, Lancashire, England, PR2 2YP. Registered in England Number: 11735831.